Plato, introduction

by Edie Wadsworth on November 16, 2012

I’m so behind with bookclub.   I’m so overzealous in every part of my life.  I want to do and learn and see and cook and read EVERYTHING.

But, alas, there are only so many hours in the day.

I hope you’re reading and please accept my pathetic apologies  for the delay on Plato’s introduction.

I’ve got too many balls in the air and this time of year, they start crashing to the ground :)

Since Julius Caesar is scheduled for December  and is relatively short, I’ll be reading Plato until the middle of December.

Then I’ll catch up on Julius Caesar at the end of December.  So don’t panic if you’re in the same boat as me.   Keep reading Plato and we can catch up over Christmas break.

Let’s tentatively plan on discussing Plato near December 14th. At least that’s what I’ll shoot for.

Don’t you love my optimism?!

I do love Plato and I’ll add some links of lectures that I’ve listened to.

Here’s my video introduction.

There’s a series of Yale lectures here that are helpful.

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{ 5 comments… read them below or add one }

1 Sarah November 25, 2012 at 10:34 pm

I’m in the same boat, glad to have a lil extra time to savor this work before discussion!

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2 Ruth November 26, 2012 at 9:24 am

I am behind on Plato also. Glad to have the extra time. Keeping the names of who is speaking in the dialogues straight has been a bit difficult. I do have to keep going back trying to get it right in my mind. I,too, thought that some of what Plato wrote is so relevant for today and this time. I’m reading a small book withmy son on letters that John Quincy Adams wrote to his son. They are on encouraging his son to read the Bible and meditate on it but it is amazing how many references there are to Greek literature. Our Founding Fathers were familiar with all great literature and it is something that is truly lost in our fast paced society, today.
Ruth

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3 Katherine @ Whitehall November 26, 2012 at 6:08 pm

Thank you for the link to the Yale lectures. I can’t wait to get to those. I have also taken a class recently that skimmed the surface of The Republic in a larger discussion of society, and can’t wait to discuss! A respiratory infection and sick baby have gotten me off track, too, but I am back to turning pages and am looking forward to hearing from everyone!

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4 Trudy K. November 30, 2012 at 4:57 pm

Thanks Edie, I found your introduction very helpful and ENCOURAGING. I was really dragging my feet on this one. :)

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5 laura@libertyfarmchronicles December 20, 2012 at 10:48 pm

My, oh, my. I needed to come back here and review your introductory video and reacquaint myself with the Yale lecture. Thank you for giving us these life lines! Plato has been and continues kicking me in the backside with it’s brilliance and what it requires of me. I’m slogging through, and I have to re-read almost every section to make sure I’m ready to go on to the next. Phew! Thankfully, I am in awe of the sparkling dialogue and energy among the characters.

Julius Caesar is on the docket for next week, but I’ll still be working on The Republic. Not only will I be reading it yet, but it’s impact and depth of ideas will be at work in me.

I too, Edie, find myself consumed with parallels for the current political timbre of our country. This, perhaps, is what I feel I am leaning towards commenting on once the book club discussion gets rolling.

Rest, recover, regroup from your injury dear, Edie. Looking forward to Plato and our fellow book nerd discussion when the time is right.

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